Smith: Let There Be Light (2006)

Howard Smith (an observant Jew and a research astrophysicist) wrote in a column at Newsday.com: The mystical Jewish Kabbalists of 16th-century Israel developed a cosmology with striking similarities to that of modern science. […T]he Kabbalists weaved an intricate account of how the universe was created with light from an infinitesimal speck that evolved with light into today’s universe. […] Modern science offers us a deeper way to explicate scriptural symbolism.…

Weiman: A Simple Guide to Happiness (2006)

Following the lead of the intro line of Rabbi Max Weiman’s monthly column at the JewishInStLouis.org to Amazon.com I realized that his new book was published in November. The description of the 68 page booklet does not give much away: This short book gives the reader a user friendly handle on three key ideas that lead to a happy life. They all boil down to independent thinking, but the important…

Mirsky: Dante, Eros, Kabbalah (2003)

I more or less accidentally came upon this book as I was looking for something else, not even Kabbalah related. I didn’t find out much about it, as there is only one Amazon review and a short description at the publisher’s (Syracuse University Press) site. The later suggests that the Zohar is a clue “to this academic detective story” about Dante and his relationship to Beatrice Portinari. And I copy…

Ariel: Kabbalah: The Mystic Quest in Judaism (2006)

In the same Cleveland Jewish News item where it was announced that David S. Ariel will step down from the presidency of Siegal College I learned of his “Kabbalah: The Mystic Quest in Judaism” book and that he will be working on another one next year. There are so many introductory texts to Kabbalah by now that it is hard for one to stand out. However this books is not…

Kushner: Kabbalah: A Love Story (2006)

I learned from the Cleveland Jewish News, but could have learned from many source about Lawrence Kushner‘s first fiction book Kabbalah: A Love Story. As I was educated by so many of his previous books I am looking forward to read this novel. Both the Cleveland review tells more of the story line and thinks of the book as s collection of interesting ideas and enjoyable fiction at the same…

Waxman: Kabbalah Simply Stated

I came across this press release, announcing Robert Waxman’s new service: Kabbalah Lessons By Phone. His latest (and as far as I can tell only book is Kabbalah Simply Stated: A Conversation with the Rabbi, from 2004. I have not read it, but I am sure that my personal approach is different than his. He advocates that Kabbalah can and should be studied by everyone. For him Kabbalah provides a…

Dante’s Equation

Last year, when I was taking a class on Religion and Film, I had an idea that I wanted to write up, but didn’t get to it. I had an epiphany that 2001: A Space Odyssey. make sense if we think in five dimensions. I was struggling to interpret the final scenes, when the protagonist seemingly goes through a whole life cycle, while at the same time retaining his essence.…

Goldwag: The Beliefnet Guide to Kabbalah

This (from The Salt Lake Tribune) was the first of the few reviews I bumped into about Arthur Goldwag’s The Beliefnet Guide to Kabbalah. It quotes Rabbi Lawrence Kushner’s introductsion “this includes ghosts, dybbuks, golems, weird dreams, bizarre coincidences, Bible codes, and secret cantations, as well as mostly everything in the general category of ‘Beam me up, Scotty’ ” – as mystical. The book’s official website at Beliefnet includes a…

Kellman: Matrix Healing

This NY Sun article pointed me to Dr. Raphael Kellman‘s Matrix Healing: Discover Your Greatest Health Potential Through the Power of Kabbalah. I am not particulalry endorsing it as I haven’t read it. I am a bit wary of the marketing type lino arodun the book, like this one: The ancient mystical tradition of Kabbalah shows us that within our day-to-day material world there is an unseen world, a place…

Lowney: A Vanished World

Here is another book not directly of the Kabbalah, but should be mentioned: Chris Lowney’s A Vanished World: Medieval Spain’s Golden Age of Enlightenment. An excerpt from the press release: “A VANISHED WORLD” chronicles religious minorities worshipping in freedom; an inspired rabbi conceiving the insights of the still-influential Kabbalah; and Jewish scribes interpreting Arabic classics for Christian princes.